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AFCYBER presents forces for Exercise Baltic Ghost

Three Air Forces Cyber operators participated in Exercise Baltic Ghost from June 25-27 in Legionowo, Poland. U.S. European Command and Poland’s National Cyber Security Centre co-hosted the table-top exercise. (U.S. Air Force graphic by Tech. Sgt. R.J. Biermann)

Cyber operators from eight nations teamed for Exercise Baltic Ghost from June 25-27 in Legionowo, Poland. U.S. European Command and Poland’s National Cyber Security Centre co-hosted the table-top exercise that challenged participants at solving several cyber scenarios. (U.S. Air Force graphic by Tech. Sgt. R.J. Biermann)

JOINT BASE SAN ANTONIO-LACKLAND, Texas --

Three Air Forces Cyber operators participated in Exercise Baltic Ghost from June 25-27 in Legionowo, Poland.

U.S. European Command and Poland’s National Cyber Security Centre co-hosted the table-top exercise.

“This exercise allowed us to highlight how the U.S. and our Allies can best support Baltic States and other European partners,” said Capt. Dawid Grzybowski, AFCYBER Partnerships and Engagements Division planner and exercise facilitator. “And that’s important because we have a vested interest in advancing the defensive cyber capabilities of partner nations that are better protected against potential adversaries.”

As a broader effort, this exercise contributed to improving NATO’s enhanced Forward Presence initiative, which aims at strengthening transatlantic bonds through various bilateral and multilateral military defense activities.

“eFP allows us to solidify relationships to gain additional support and participation, strengthen communication, refine capabilities and showcase our commitment to willing partner nations; all contributing to AFCYBER’s ability to deliver full-spectrum cyberspace capabilities across the globe,” Grzybowski said.

Throughout the exercise participants were divided into teams and worked through various cyber scenario injects. Grzybowski and other facilitators helped further candid discussion to identify cyber defense shortfalls, organizational and multinational concerns, and propose possible solutions. For the Polish-born Airman, it was a welcome task.

“It was refreshing to interact with our Polish partners because we could communicate in their native language,” he said. “Being able to understand and speak Polish allowed them to participate in comfortable conversation where they were able to freely articulate their thoughts and gain better insights into what we were there to accomplish.”

In addition to AFCYBER’s presence, National Guardsmen from Illinois, Maryland, Michigan and Pennsylvania teamed with their Estonian, German, Latvian, Lithuanian, Dutch, Polish and British cyber counterparts throughout the three-day event.